Jim and Huck in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 7 page paper which examines the relationship between Jim and Huck in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Maturing of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A fifteen page paper comparing these two protagonists in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” The paper shows that Tom remains childlike because he is essentially conventional, and has never been forced to make adult decisions; Huck, on the other hand, has forged his own code of ethics at an early age. No additional sources.

Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Tom And Huck: Moral Influence

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of a tolerant adult. When Tom Sawyer shows up in the story and Huck concurs to being a member of Tom's gang, it becomes easy for one to see how make-believe, a concept borrowed from Romantic fiction, pervades childhood in this world; soon afterward the reader encounters myriad situations in which adults illustrate just how susceptible they are to the same circumstance. The writer discusses the influence that Tom had over Huck. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 3 page paper which examines elements from Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn and Do-Gooders

A 3 page paper which examines the satirizing of do-gooders in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Religion and Hypocrisy in Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn”

A 10 page paper which examines the theme of hypocrisy through religion in Mark Twain’s “the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Twain’s Huckleberry Finn

A 5 page paper which analyzes the content and message of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Morality In The Works Of Mark Twain

A 7 page paper examining Twain's evocation of morals in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. The paper concludes that Twain wrote books not only for entertainment, but to express his particular views on morality as well. Bibliography lists nine sources.

Twain's 'Huck Finn' and Emerson's 'Self-Reliance'

A five page paper showing how Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay aids the reader in understanding the motivation of Huck in Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.' The paper argues that the social rules cannot keep Huck from answering the call of his conscience and his heart. No additional sources.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer

A 3 page essay that discusses Twain's Tom Sawyer. Mark Twain's most famous book is Huckleberry Finn and critics agree that it is a greater literary achievement than its predecessor The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). However, this work, which Twain referred to as a "hymn" to boyhood, has always been more widely read than Huck (Rasmussen 216). A factor in Tom Sawyer's perennial popularity is undoubtedly due to the fact that this novel demonstrates the social, physical and emotional struggles of the human maturation process, as the reader follows Tom's growth throughout the narrative. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Huck Finn and Jim’s Trip Down the Mississippi

A 4 page paper which presents a literary map of the journey taken by Huck Finn and Jim down the Mississippi River in Mark Twain’s novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

The Battle Against Society in Twain and Salinger

A seven page paper looking at the way the two adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” battle against their respective societies because they instinctively feel that their culture is wrong. Although the issues are very different -- slavery in “Huck Finn”, the emptiness of upper-class values in “Catcher” -- both boys undergo maturational experiences which suggest that they will make a difference in society as they grow up. Bibliography lists three sources.

Huck Finn/A Search for Identity

A 3 page essay that discusses Huck's search for identity in Samuel Clemens' (Mark Twain's) novel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Throughout the narrative, Huck tries on different persona. He attempts to be "sivilized" under the care of the Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson. Journeying down the Mississippi in the company of a Jim, a runaway slave, Huck attempts to be the glamorous "robber" of Tom Sawyer's fantasy, but finds he that he cannot bring himself to con people in the manner demonstrated by the nefarious "aristocrats" who call themselves the "duke and the dauphin." In the course of his adventures, Huck tries to make sense of cultural mores and norms and finds that this is an impossible task. Ultimately, he rejects all "sivilizing" efforts in order to pursue a life where he can grow and develop according to his own ideas of right and wrong. Bibliography lists 2 sources.