The Battle Against Society in Twain and Salinger

A seven page paper looking at the way the two adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” battle against their respective societies because they instinctively feel that their culture is wrong. Although the issues are very different -- slavery in “Huck Finn”, the emptiness of upper-class values in “Catcher” -- both boys undergo maturational experiences which suggest that they will make a difference in society as they grow up. Bibliography lists three sources.

Twain/Pudd'nhead Wilson, A Sociological View

A 5 page essay that argues that Twain took a sociological stance in his book The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson. While Twain's story is set in the antebellum era, it addresses sociological attitudes that were still prevalent throughout American society. People honestly believed that racist conventions, such as segregationist policies, could be rationalized through the belief that whites were genetically superior to other races. In Pudd'nhead Wilson, Twain's principal point is sociological in nature, that the slave mentality comes from society rather than from birth. No additional sources cited.

The Depiction of White People in Works of Twain and Douglass

A six page paper looking at the way Mark Twain and Frederick Douglass perceive white people as evidenced by "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" and Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". The paper concludes that both Twain and Douglass show Southern white society -- not whites as individuals -- to be the most significant factor in the problem of racism. Bibliography lists six sources.

Racism, "Huck Finn," and "Pudd'nhead Wilson"

A 20 page paper looking at the historical identity of American blacks between 1850-1900 as related to the racial theories of the time, and in the context of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" and "The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson." The paper points out that Twain was a white man who wrote of racism, but he was not a racist author. Rather, Twain recognized that blacks of the late nineteenth century faced challenges just as great as those they faced under slavery: denigration at the hands of white society, and their own lack of self-esteem. Bibliography lists nine sources.

Huck Finn is Not a Racist Book

A 4 page essay that argues that Huck Finn is not a racist book. It has become a perennial issue that books, even classics, that contain “’racially offensive’” words should be banned from high school curricula and Mark Twain’s classic Huckleberry Finn is always a target of such campaigns (Bertin 18). The irony in this situation is the idea that Mark Twain’s novel could be viewed as anything other than a humanistic classic that stands up for the rights of individuals, particularly blacks, in the face of a societal context that legitimized and tolerated gross racial injustice. Examination of Twain’s classic shows that it is most definitively not racist, but is rather a manifesto against racism, injustice and the glorification of the past. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' / Presentation Of Moral Issues

An 8 page paper discussing the evolution of Huck's own sense of ethics in contrast to those of the nineteenth-century ante-bellum society in which Twain wrote. It is ultimately concluded that the story confronts us with questions of what American society is and what it should and could be--Even in light of criticisms surrounding the book, the moral issues presented make it a most worthwhile story. Bibliography lists 6 supporting sources plus the novel itself.

Mark Twain / A Life Of Writing.. And Controversy

A 6 page paper on the life and works of Samuel Clemens, pen name-- Mark Twain. The writer discusses how some of Twain's own life experiences along the Mississippi River and elsewhere are reflected in his fiction. Several key works including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'Huckleberry Finn,' & 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court' are examined. Some of the controversy over Mark Twain's content is brought up as well. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger

In the conclusion of Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger, the author argues that there is no God, no universe, no human race, no heaven, or no hell. This 5 page paper attempts to determine whether Twain actually meant this assertion, or if this was another one of Twain’s attempts to demonstrate his irreverence towards religion common in his writings at the end of the 19th century. No additional sources cited.

Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

SATIRE IN CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT

This 6 page paper discusses the use of satire in Mark Twain's novel, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Specific examples given to show Twain's satire toward the British and the legend of Arthur, feudal England, science and industry versus tradition, and values in the American culture of Twain's time. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Clemons/Huck Finn & Lying

A 3 page research paper that examines lies and lying as a central theme in the American classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Samuel Clemens (writing under the name of Mark Twain). The writer argues that an examination of this novel shows how lies, ones told by Huck and ones perpetuated by society, propel the action of the novel and point toward the novel's principal theme, which concerns the way in which the antebellum South portrayed a runaway slave as "stealing" himself. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Social Conflict in “Huckleberry Finn” and Other Stories

A 5 page paper looking at Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, plus five other short stories and novellas, in terms of their treatment of the conflict between the demands of society and individual expression. Stories covered include Sarah Orne Jewett’s “A White Heron;” Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge;” Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat,” Henry James’ “The Real Thing;” and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper.” No additional sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Analysis

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,' effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of tolerance. Indeed, Huckleberry Finn was immune to the racial bigotry of his surrounding community, successfully capable of overlooking a person's skin color or lack of education as a means by which to judge. The writer discusses how this particular aspect of the boy's character clearly addresses the racial open-mindedness that did was nowhere to be found in Finn's society. No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn vs. Raisin In The Sun

A 5 page look at how society's hardships inherently upset the dreams --and even moralities of characters in the novels of Twain and Hansberry. No additional sources cited.

Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' / Theme Of Escape

A 5 page paper that addresses the theme of escape and how it is used, defined and counterbalanced among the characters in Mark Twain's novel. Particular attention is paid to the characters of Huck Finn and Jim, who represent various themes of escape in regards to slavery. This is contrasted (counterbalanced) to representatives of the white and slave societies in the novel, with Huck and Jim both representing both of those cultures and the political voices within them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.