Huckleberry Finn: Character Analysis

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,' effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of tolerance. Indeed, Huckleberry Finn was immune to the racial bigotry of his surrounding community, successfully capable of overlooking a person's skin color or lack of education as a means by which to judge. The writer discusses how this particular aspect of the boy's character clearly addresses the racial open-mindedness that did was nowhere to be found in Finn's society. No additional sources cited.

'Huckleberry Finn' - the Forms of Dialect

A 6 page paper which presents the types of dialect found in Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn.' Bibliography lists 1 additional sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Summary and Chapter-by-Chapter Overview

This 10 page paper provides a summary of the characters and a chapter-by-chapter overview of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

Jim and Huck in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 7 page paper which examines the relationship between Jim and Huck in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 3 page paper which examines elements from Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." No additional sources cited.

Religion and Hypocrisy in Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn”

A 10 page paper which examines the theme of hypocrisy through religion in Mark Twain’s “the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn and Do-Gooders

A 3 page paper which examines the satirizing of do-gooders in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Twain’s Huckleberry Finn

A 5 page paper which analyzes the content and message of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Analysis Of Three Fictional Stories

9 pages in length. The writer discusses naturalism and realism in Edith Wharton's "Roman Fever," regionalism in Jewett's "The White Heron" and romanticism and realism in Twain's "Huckleberry Finn." No bibliography.

Language and Realism in Huck Finn

A 5 page research paper/essay that examines Mark Twain's use of language in his classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The writer addresses the controversy that has surrounded this novel concerning language use and defends Twain, while discussing his expert use of dialect and vernacular. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Realism and Language in Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn”

A five page paper analyzing Mark Twain’s classification as a realist writer on the basis of his accurate use of dialect in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The paper defines realism and briefly describes the realist movement of the late nineteenth-century, then discusses how Twain fits into this tradition. Bibliography lists two sources.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” as an Example of the Realism Style and as a Comment on Racism and Social Darwinism of the Late 19th Century

This is an 8 page paper discussing Huckleberry Finn in relation to racism, realism and social Darwinism. When the “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was released in 1884, it was originally thought to be considered racist and has over the years been banned from many reading lists in schools. Upon further reflection however, critics believe that although it appears racist, it was actually Mark Twain’s comment on the racism which existed in the society of his day and was one of the first novels to give slaves and African Americans a character which seemingly is written from the black perspective in Jim. Twain’s works, including Huckleberry Finn were seen as more visionary and depicted the early realism style of the time and the increase in the American writers perspective on social Darwinism which existed in society and seemed as the theory oppressors applied in order to justify slavery and child labour in their markets. Through the character of Huck Finn, Twain used the realistic aspects of colloquial language, a middle-American view of modernization and the unreasonableness of the society of the late 1800s. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Romanticism and Realism in Huckleberry Finn

A 10 page paper which examines the influence and presence of Romanticism and Realism in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 2 ½ pages are annotated bibliography. Bibliography lists 8 sources.