The Battle Against Society in Twain and Salinger

A seven page paper looking at the way the two adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” battle against their respective societies because they instinctively feel that their culture is wrong. Although the issues are very different -- slavery in “Huck Finn”, the emptiness of upper-class values in “Catcher” -- both boys undergo maturational experiences which suggest that they will make a difference in society as they grow up. Bibliography lists three sources.

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn vs J. D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye/ Holden vs Huck #2

In 4 pages the author compares the main characters of 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' by Mark Twain and 'The Catcher in the Rye' by J.D. Salinger. Huckleberry Finn and Holden Caulfield share many similarities and some differences. They are both boys trying to get by the best they know how. Huck Finn lived along the Mississippi River. Holden Caulfield lived in Pennsylvania. Huck Finn was rural. Holden Caulfield was city. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn vs J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye / Holden vs Huck

A 5 page paper on comparing these two immortal adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye. The paper observes that although neither boy really understands what he has learned at the end of his tale, he has learned a great deal and is ready to go out into the world and put his 'heart knowledge' into practice. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Jim and Huck in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 7 page paper which examines the relationship between Jim and Huck in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Religion and Hypocrisy in Twain’s “Huckleberry Finn”

A 10 page paper which examines the theme of hypocrisy through religion in Mark Twain’s “the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn and Do-Gooders

A 3 page paper which examines the satirizing of do-gooders in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” No additional sources cited.

Twain’s Huckleberry Finn

A 5 page paper which analyzes the content and message of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 3 page paper which examines elements from Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Summary and Chapter-by-Chapter Overview

This 10 page paper provides a summary of the characters and a chapter-by-chapter overview of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

'Huckleberry Finn' - the Forms of Dialect

A 6 page paper which presents the types of dialect found in Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn.' Bibliography lists 1 additional sources.

Twain's 'Huck Finn' and Emerson's 'Self-Reliance'

A five page paper showing how Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay aids the reader in understanding the motivation of Huck in Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.' The paper argues that the social rules cannot keep Huck from answering the call of his conscience and his heart. No additional sources.

Huck Finn and Jim’s Trip Down the Mississippi

A 4 page paper which presents a literary map of the journey taken by Huck Finn and Jim down the Mississippi River in Mark Twain’s novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Analysis

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,' effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of tolerance. Indeed, Huckleberry Finn was immune to the racial bigotry of his surrounding community, successfully capable of overlooking a person's skin color or lack of education as a means by which to judge. The writer discusses how this particular aspect of the boy's character clearly addresses the racial open-mindedness that did was nowhere to be found in Finn's society. No additional sources cited.