Huckleberry Finn-Storyteller/Hero.

(5 pp) Samuel Clemen's masterpiece The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade) (1884) poses Huckleberry Finn as a hero in his own right. However Huck is a hero on the move; he refers to Tom Sawyer often, but this is still Huck's novel.

The Maturing of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A fifteen page paper comparing these two protagonists in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” The paper shows that Tom remains childlike because he is essentially conventional, and has never been forced to make adult decisions; Huck, on the other hand, has forged his own code of ethics at an early age. No additional sources.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A 7 page paper which compares and contrasts "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Morality In The Works Of Mark Twain

A 7 page paper examining Twain's evocation of morals in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. The paper concludes that Twain wrote books not only for entertainment, but to express his particular views on morality as well. Bibliography lists nine sources.

Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”: Grades for Teaching Irony, Historical Context and Racism

This is a 3 page paper discussing “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” in regards to its place within the educational system and grade levels which can appreciate the work. “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was written by Mark Twain (a.k.a. Samuel Langhorne Clemens, 1835-1910) in 1884 and was originally meant to be read as adult fiction and as a sequel to “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” written in 1881, although it is a text which can stand on its own. While the book remains one of the most taught works of American literature, it is considered as difficult to teach and controversial because of the racial content and use of colloquialism. In most cases, the book is left for the higher grade levels ranging from junior high to graduate school because of the racial content and the high level of irony used which could be misunderstood or missed by students in the younger grades. In addition, most critics believe that students should be taught the book in later grades when the students would be able to place the book in a larger historical context. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Tom And Huck: Moral Influence

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of a tolerant adult. When Tom Sawyer shows up in the story and Huck concurs to being a member of Tom's gang, it becomes easy for one to see how make-believe, a concept borrowed from Romantic fiction, pervades childhood in this world; soon afterward the reader encounters myriad situations in which adults illustrate just how susceptible they are to the same circumstance. The writer discusses the influence that Tom had over Huck. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Character of Huckleberry Finn

A 4 page paper which examines the development of the character of Huckleberry Finn in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Bibliography lists 2 additional sources.

Tom Sawyer in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 5 page paper which discusses the character and role of Tom Sawyer in the last half of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." No additional sources cited.

Mark Twain / A Life Of Writing.. And Controversy

A 6 page paper on the life and works of Samuel Clemens, pen name-- Mark Twain. The writer discusses how some of Twain's own life experiences along the Mississippi River and elsewhere are reflected in his fiction. Several key works including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'Huckleberry Finn,' & 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court' are examined. Some of the controversy over Mark Twain's content is brought up as well. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Tom and Huck’s Friendship in Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'

A 7 page look at the relationship of these two boyhood friends in Mark Twain’s classic novel. The paper argues that the significant differences between Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer actually encapsulate the novel’s theme. No additional sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Analysis

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,' effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of tolerance. Indeed, Huckleberry Finn was immune to the racial bigotry of his surrounding community, successfully capable of overlooking a person's skin color or lack of education as a means by which to judge. The writer discusses how this particular aspect of the boy's character clearly addresses the racial open-mindedness that did was nowhere to be found in Finn's society. No additional sources cited.

Mark Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” as an Example of the Realism Style and as a Comment on Racism and Social Darwinism of the Late 19th Century

This is an 8 page paper discussing Huckleberry Finn in relation to racism, realism and social Darwinism. When the “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was released in 1884, it was originally thought to be considered racist and has over the years been banned from many reading lists in schools. Upon further reflection however, critics believe that although it appears racist, it was actually Mark Twain’s comment on the racism which existed in the society of his day and was one of the first novels to give slaves and African Americans a character which seemingly is written from the black perspective in Jim. Twain’s works, including Huckleberry Finn were seen as more visionary and depicted the early realism style of the time and the increase in the American writers perspective on social Darwinism which existed in society and seemed as the theory oppressors applied in order to justify slavery and child labour in their markets. Through the character of Huck Finn, Twain used the realistic aspects of colloquial language, a middle-American view of modernization and the unreasonableness of the society of the late 1800s. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Battle Against Society in Twain and Salinger

A seven page paper looking at the way the two adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” battle against their respective societies because they instinctively feel that their culture is wrong. Although the issues are very different -- slavery in “Huck Finn”, the emptiness of upper-class values in “Catcher” -- both boys undergo maturational experiences which suggest that they will make a difference in society as they grow up. Bibliography lists three sources.

Huck Finn and Jim’s Trip Down the Mississippi

A 4 page paper which presents a literary map of the journey taken by Huck Finn and Jim down the Mississippi River in Mark Twain’s novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Bibliography lists 1 source.