Emotional Changes in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Emotional Changes in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer : A 3 page paper which examines the emotional changes seen in Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. No additional sources cited.

Huckleberry Finn-Storyteller/Hero.

(5 pp) Samuel Clemen's masterpiece The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade) (1884) poses Huckleberry Finn as a hero in his own right. However Huck is a hero on the move; he refers to Tom Sawyer often, but this is still Huck's novel.

Journeys: Tom Sawyer and Peter Pan

A 6 page paper which examines the symbolism of the journeys taken in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and J.M. Barrie’s “Peter Pan (Peter and Wendy).” No additional sources cited.

Mark Twain's Tom Sawyer

A 3 page essay that discusses Twain's Tom Sawyer. Mark Twain's most famous book is Huckleberry Finn and critics agree that it is a greater literary achievement than its predecessor The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). However, this work, which Twain referred to as a "hymn" to boyhood, has always been more widely read than Huck (Rasmussen 216). A factor in Tom Sawyer's perennial popularity is undoubtedly due to the fact that this novel demonstrates the social, physical and emotional struggles of the human maturation process, as the reader follows Tom's growth throughout the narrative. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Maturing of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A fifteen page paper comparing these two protagonists in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” The paper shows that Tom remains childlike because he is essentially conventional, and has never been forced to make adult decisions; Huck, on the other hand, has forged his own code of ethics at an early age. No additional sources.

Tom And Huck: Moral Influence

5 pages in length. The character of Huckleberry Finn, in Mark Twain's classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, effectively incorporates the innocence of a child with the wisdom of a tolerant adult. When Tom Sawyer shows up in the story and Huck concurs to being a member of Tom's gang, it becomes easy for one to see how make-believe, a concept borrowed from Romantic fiction, pervades childhood in this world; soon afterward the reader encounters myriad situations in which adults illustrate just how susceptible they are to the same circumstance. The writer discusses the influence that Tom had over Huck. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Tom and Huck’s Friendship in Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'

A 7 page look at the relationship of these two boyhood friends in Mark Twain’s classic novel. The paper argues that the significant differences between Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer actually encapsulate the novel’s theme. No additional sources.

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A 7 page paper which compares and contrasts "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Tom Sawyer and Superstition

A 5 page paper which examines how superstitious Tom Sawyer is in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.” No additional sources cited.

Tom Sawyer in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

A 5 page paper which discusses the character and role of Tom Sawyer in the last half of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." No additional sources cited.

Tom Sawyer’s Pranks at the Conclusion of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

A 3 page paper which examines how when Tom Sawyer re-entry into the action towards the end of the novel is gratuitous and reduces the roles of Huck and Jim. No additional sources are used.