The Depiction of White People in Works of Twain and Douglass

A six page paper looking at the way Mark Twain and Frederick Douglass perceive white people as evidenced by "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" and Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". The paper concludes that both Twain and Douglass show Southern white society -- not whites as individuals -- to be the most significant factor in the problem of racism. Bibliography lists six sources.

Twain: Politically Correct?

Was Mark Twain prejudiced? This 5 page paper explores Twain's depiction of women, Blacks, Jews and Indians in an attempt to answer that question. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mark Twain / A Life Of Writing.. And Controversy

A 6 page paper on the life and works of Samuel Clemens, pen name-- Mark Twain. The writer discusses how some of Twain's own life experiences along the Mississippi River and elsewhere are reflected in his fiction. Several key works including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'Huckleberry Finn,' & 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court' are examined. Some of the controversy over Mark Twain's content is brought up as well. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Literary Wizardry of T.H. White & Mark Twain

A 7 page paper that examines T.H. White's The Sword in the Stone and Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper and explains why each has not only become a classic work of children's literature but also an historical work that teaches the merits of justice and benevolence. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mark Twain and Southern Values

A five-page paper which looks at society in the Southern states at the time of Mark Twain and how Southern values influenced his writing. The writer cites examples from four of Twain’s novels, The Innocents Abroad, Pudd’nhead Wilson, Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn and considers how Twain juxtaposed the virtues and shortcoming of Southern culture in these works. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Racism, "Huck Finn," and "Pudd'nhead Wilson"

A 20 page paper looking at the historical identity of American blacks between 1850-1900 as related to the racial theories of the time, and in the context of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" and "The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson." The paper points out that Twain was a white man who wrote of racism, but he was not a racist author. Rather, Twain recognized that blacks of the late nineteenth century faced challenges just as great as those they faced under slavery: denigration at the hands of white society, and their own lack of self-esteem. Bibliography lists nine sources.

Twain/Pudd'nhead Wilson, A Sociological View

A 5 page essay that argues that Twain took a sociological stance in his book The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson. While Twain's story is set in the antebellum era, it addresses sociological attitudes that were still prevalent throughout American society. People honestly believed that racist conventions, such as segregationist policies, could be rationalized through the belief that whites were genetically superior to other races. In Pudd'nhead Wilson, Twain's principal point is sociological in nature, that the slave mentality comes from society rather than from birth. No additional sources cited.

Comparison & Critique of Mark Twain's "Roughing It" and James G. Swan's "Northwest Coast" With Regard to the Depiction of Indians

A 6 page paper which examines two frontier novels of the mid-nineteenth century, Mark Twain's "Roughing It" (1872) and James G. Swan's "Northwest Coast" (1857) to consider the authors' depiction of the American Indian. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Twain's The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg

Twain's The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg, has been said to strip "away the pretensions of self-appointed arbiters of morality". This 5 page paper asserts that money corrupts, people are basically weak when confronted by temptation and even the incorruptible Christian can engage in ritual hypocrisy under the direction of the Devil. These basic principles are the theme to Mark Twain's short story. Bibliography lists 6 sources.

The Two Sides of Mark Twain

A 7 page paper on the life and works of Mark Twain. It points out that the persona the author presents in the earlier short stories [Innocents Abroad, The Gilded Age, The Prince & The Pauper, etc;] is much different than the one he presents in Huckleberry Finn. Bibliography lists 5 sources including Twain's books.

Mark Twain's 'The Story of the Bad Little Boy'

A 5 page paper on this short story by Mark Twain. The story is analyzed and the theme is examined and compared to Twain's other works.

Huckleberry Finn: Twain's Transition Piece

A 6 page paper which examines Mark Twain's book "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," illustrating how it is perhaps a transition work which demonstrates Twain moving into his dark period. No additional sources cited.

Overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”

This is an 8 page paper providing an overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”. The paper also includes some tutorial language throughout in square brackets. Mark Twain (1835-1910) wrote his social and political satire “The Prince and the Pauper” in 1881 to tell the story of the social injustices which existed within 16th century Tudor England during which the story is placed; injustices which were still present during Twain’s time in the 19th century. Twain easily and clearly shows these injustices by just presenting “a case of mistaken identity” a situation in which Twain explained that “It may have happened, it may not have happened; but it could have happened” (Twain, 2003). The main concept is based on the social education of the central characters Edward Tudor (the Prince) and Tom Canty (the Pauper) who both benefit from living one another’s lives. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

SATIRE IN CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT

This 6 page paper discusses the use of satire in Mark Twain's novel, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Specific examples given to show Twain's satire toward the British and the legend of Arthur, feudal England, science and industry versus tradition, and values in the American culture of Twain's time. Quotes cited from texts. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger

In the conclusion of Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger, the author argues that there is no God, no universe, no human race, no heaven, or no hell. This 5 page paper attempts to determine whether Twain actually meant this assertion, or if this was another one of Twain’s attempts to demonstrate his irreverence towards religion common in his writings at the end of the 19th century. No additional sources cited.