Mark Twain’s Unworldly Protagonists

A five page paper looking at several of Twain's works in terms of their most characteristic feature: his creation of an innocent, unworldly protagonist who is able to see the adult world with fresh eyes. Specific works discussed are 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'The Prince and the Pauper,' and 'Life on the Mississippi.' Bibliography lists seven sources.

Journey to Self-Awareness in Emma, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and My Name is Asher Lev

In four pages this paper examines how the protagonists in these respective novels by Jane Austen, Mark Twain, and Chaim Potok embark upon the journeys that ultimately lead to their self-awareness. Also considered is how the literary elements of the journey motif, characterization of the protagonists as outsiders, and coming of age theme affect the reader’s perceptions of each protagonist’s growth. There are no additional sources listed in the bibliography.

Mark Twain's "The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn": Southern Values

6 pages in length. The writer discusses how Twains novel addresses the issue of southern values. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

The Maturing of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A fifteen page paper comparing these two protagonists in Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” and “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” The paper shows that Tom remains childlike because he is essentially conventional, and has never been forced to make adult decisions; Huck, on the other hand, has forged his own code of ethics at an early age. No additional sources.

The Battle Against Society in Twain and Salinger

A seven page paper looking at the way the two adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and J.D. Salinger’s “Catcher in the Rye” battle against their respective societies because they instinctively feel that their culture is wrong. Although the issues are very different -- slavery in “Huck Finn”, the emptiness of upper-class values in “Catcher” -- both boys undergo maturational experiences which suggest that they will make a difference in society as they grow up. Bibliography lists three sources.

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn vs J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye / Holden vs Huck

A 5 page paper on comparing these two immortal adolescent protagonists of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye. The paper observes that although neither boy really understands what he has learned at the end of his tale, he has learned a great deal and is ready to go out into the world and put his 'heart knowledge' into practice. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Summary and Chapter-by-Chapter Overview

This 10 page paper provides a summary of the characters and a chapter-by-chapter overview of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

Mark Twain / A Life Of Writing.. And Controversy

A 6 page paper on the life and works of Samuel Clemens, pen name-- Mark Twain. The writer discusses how some of Twain's own life experiences along the Mississippi River and elsewhere are reflected in his fiction. Several key works including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'Huckleberry Finn,' & 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court' are examined. Some of the controversy over Mark Twain's content is brought up as well. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' / Jim's Development

An 8 page paper tracking the progression of Jim's characterization in Mark Twain's novel from a superstitious stereotype to a real human being. The paper observes that Huck's realization that Jim is his equal parallels Jim's own. Bibliography lists eight sources.

Social Consciousness and Huckleberry Finn

This 8 page essay that Huck's bond with Jim, in Mark Twain's classic novel, prompts his moral maturation and enables him to reject automatic acceptance of slavery, which is part of his environment. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Individualism in the Work of Mark Twain

A 3 page paper which examines the theme of individualism in the work of Mark Twain. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Emotional Changes in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Emotional Changes in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer : A 3 page paper which examines the emotional changes seen in Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. No additional sources cited.

Overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”

This is an 8 page paper providing an overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”. The paper also includes some tutorial language throughout in square brackets. Mark Twain (1835-1910) wrote his social and political satire “The Prince and the Pauper” in 1881 to tell the story of the social injustices which existed within 16th century Tudor England during which the story is placed; injustices which were still present during Twain’s time in the 19th century. Twain easily and clearly shows these injustices by just presenting “a case of mistaken identity” a situation in which Twain explained that “It may have happened, it may not have happened; but it could have happened” (Twain, 2003). The main concept is based on the social education of the central characters Edward Tudor (the Prince) and Tom Canty (the Pauper) who both benefit from living one another’s lives. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Huck Finn is Not a Racist Book

A 4 page essay that argues that Huck Finn is not a racist book. It has become a perennial issue that books, even classics, that contain “’racially offensive’” words should be banned from high school curricula and Mark Twain’s classic Huckleberry Finn is always a target of such campaigns (Bertin 18). The irony in this situation is the idea that Mark Twain’s novel could be viewed as anything other than a humanistic classic that stands up for the rights of individuals, particularly blacks, in the face of a societal context that legitimized and tolerated gross racial injustice. Examination of Twain’s classic shows that it is most definitively not racist, but is rather a manifesto against racism, injustice and the glorification of the past. Bibliography lists 5 sources.