Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger

In the conclusion of Mark Twain’s The Mysterious Stranger, the author argues that there is no God, no universe, no human race, no heaven, or no hell. This 5 page paper attempts to determine whether Twain actually meant this assertion, or if this was another one of Twain’s attempts to demonstrate his irreverence towards religion common in his writings at the end of the 19th century. No additional sources cited.

Mark Twain's "The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn": Southern Values

6 pages in length. The writer discusses how Twains novel addresses the issue of southern values. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Character Summary and Chapter-by-Chapter Overview

This 10 page paper provides a summary of the characters and a chapter-by-chapter overview of Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.

Mark Twain / A Life Of Writing.. And Controversy

A 6 page paper on the life and works of Samuel Clemens, pen name-- Mark Twain. The writer discusses how some of Twain's own life experiences along the Mississippi River and elsewhere are reflected in his fiction. Several key works including 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' 'Huckleberry Finn,' & 'A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court' are examined. Some of the controversy over Mark Twain's content is brought up as well. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

Language and Realism in Huck Finn

A 5 page research paper/essay that examines Mark Twain's use of language in his classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The writer addresses the controversy that has surrounded this novel concerning language use and defends Twain, while discussing his expert use of dialect and vernacular. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy

In 5 pages, the author discusses Mark Twain 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy.' Concerning Mark Twain's 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' there are several controversies. One controversy is whether the story depicts racism, or represents racism. There is controversy over gender and sexuality. There is also controversy over the ending to the story. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' / Jim's Development

An 8 page paper tracking the progression of Jim's characterization in Mark Twain's novel from a superstitious stereotype to a real human being. The paper observes that Huck's realization that Jim is his equal parallels Jim's own. Bibliography lists eight sources.

Individualism in the Work of Mark Twain

A 3 page paper which examines the theme of individualism in the work of Mark Twain. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Social Consciousness and Huckleberry Finn

This 8 page essay that Huck's bond with Jim, in Mark Twain's classic novel, prompts his moral maturation and enables him to reject automatic acceptance of slavery, which is part of his environment. Bibliography lists 10 sources.

Feminism in Twain’s “Pudd’nhead Wilson”

A 5 page paper which examines Mark Twain’s novel “Pudd’nhead Wilson” from a feminist perspective. Bibliography lists 5 additional sources.

Huckleberry Finn: Twain's Transition Piece

A 6 page paper which examines Mark Twain's book "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," illustrating how it is perhaps a transition work which demonstrates Twain moving into his dark period. No additional sources cited.

Huck Finn is Not a Racist Book

A 4 page essay that argues that Huck Finn is not a racist book. It has become a perennial issue that books, even classics, that contain “’racially offensive’” words should be banned from high school curricula and Mark Twain’s classic Huckleberry Finn is always a target of such campaigns (Bertin 18). The irony in this situation is the idea that Mark Twain’s novel could be viewed as anything other than a humanistic classic that stands up for the rights of individuals, particularly blacks, in the face of a societal context that legitimized and tolerated gross racial injustice. Examination of Twain’s classic shows that it is most definitively not racist, but is rather a manifesto against racism, injustice and the glorification of the past. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”

This is an 8 page paper providing an overview of Mark Twain’s “The Prince and the Pauper”. The paper also includes some tutorial language throughout in square brackets. Mark Twain (1835-1910) wrote his social and political satire “The Prince and the Pauper” in 1881 to tell the story of the social injustices which existed within 16th century Tudor England during which the story is placed; injustices which were still present during Twain’s time in the 19th century. Twain easily and clearly shows these injustices by just presenting “a case of mistaken identity” a situation in which Twain explained that “It may have happened, it may not have happened; but it could have happened” (Twain, 2003). The main concept is based on the social education of the central characters Edward Tudor (the Prince) and Tom Canty (the Pauper) who both benefit from living one another’s lives. Bibliography lists 2 sources.

Huckleberry Finn's Quest for Freedom

This 5 page paper provides an overview of Mark Twain's story, but also examines the quest for freedom theme as contained in the work. The river is discussed as a symbolic element. Several quotes from the work are included. No additional sources cited.

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

A 7 page paper which compares and contrasts "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain. Bibliography lists 10 sources.