Clemons/Huck Finn & Lying

A 3 page research paper that examines lies and lying as a central theme in the American classic The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Samuel Clemens (writing under the name of Mark Twain). The writer argues that an examination of this novel shows how lies, ones told by Huck and ones perpetuated by society, propel the action of the novel and point toward the novel's principal theme, which concerns the way in which the antebellum South portrayed a runaway slave as "stealing" himself. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Controversial Literature: Huck Finn

5 pages in length. Controversial may well be the first word used to describe Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn long before any summary is offered. Peppered with the words "racist" and "sympathizer," any synopsis of this book would be remiss without also mentioning the legacy of debate Twain - perhaps purposely - left behind. To look at either the character or story of Huck Finn as anything but a social mirror is to read more into Twain's meaning, however, public construal continues to be divided as to the author's true intent. Bibliography lists 8 sources.

Huck Finn and Jim’s Trip Down the Mississippi

A 4 page paper which presents a literary map of the journey taken by Huck Finn and Jim down the Mississippi River in Mark Twain’s novel “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” Bibliography lists 1 source.

Huck Finn Discussion Questions

This is an 8 page paper that provides an overview of Huck Finn. Various discussion questions are answered in depth. Bibliography lists 1 source.

Huck Finn is Not a Racist Book

A 4 page essay that argues that Huck Finn is not a racist book. It has become a perennial issue that books, even classics, that contain “’racially offensive’” words should be banned from high school curricula and Mark Twain’s classic Huckleberry Finn is always a target of such campaigns (Bertin 18). The irony in this situation is the idea that Mark Twain’s novel could be viewed as anything other than a humanistic classic that stands up for the rights of individuals, particularly blacks, in the face of a societal context that legitimized and tolerated gross racial injustice. Examination of Twain’s classic shows that it is most definitively not racist, but is rather a manifesto against racism, injustice and the glorification of the past. Bibliography lists 5 sources.

Mark Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' / Theme Of Escape

A 5 page paper that addresses the theme of escape and how it is used, defined and counterbalanced among the characters in Mark Twain's novel. Particular attention is paid to the characters of Huck Finn and Jim, who represent various themes of escape in regards to slavery. This is contrasted (counterbalanced) to representatives of the white and slave societies in the novel, with Huck and Jim both representing both of those cultures and the political voices within them. Bibliography lists 4 sources.

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn vs J. D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye/ Holden vs Huck #2

In 4 pages the author compares the main characters of 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' by Mark Twain and 'The Catcher in the Rye' by J.D. Salinger. Huckleberry Finn and Holden Caulfield share many similarities and some differences. They are both boys trying to get by the best they know how. Huck Finn lived along the Mississippi River. Holden Caulfield lived in Pennsylvania. Huck Finn was rural. Holden Caulfield was city. Bibliography lists 7 sources.

The Theme of Self-Reliance is found in Emma, Huck Finn and My Name is Asher Lev

This 6 page paper examines the three protagonists from the novels Emma, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and My Name is Asher Lev. In addition to the idea of self-reliance, other thematic elements are explored as well as setting and characterization. Bibliography lists 3 sources.

Tom and Huck’s Friendship in Twain’s “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'

A 7 page look at the relationship of these two boyhood friends in Mark Twain’s classic novel. The paper argues that the significant differences between Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer actually encapsulate the novel’s theme. No additional sources.